Is the Covid-19 Vaccine Safe?

Tre Cobbs, Staff Writer

I read an article recently that I thought was important to share. It went over if the Corona Virus vaccine is safe and if we as a community should be worried about what is in the vaccine and the side effects of the vaccine that could be deadly. It covers all of the questions surrounding the vaccine that people have been asking, such as what steps were taken to make sure that the vaccine is safe and why the vaccines were developed so quickly in the first place. In my opinion and in other people’s opinions, the vaccines were produced so quick, and it seems like the United States did this to make the country go back to normal in a faster pace so that things such as the economy can increase and so that people can get their jobs back in the career field. It said that the main vaccines, Pfizer and Moderna, have good safety records and that they are effective. The other vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson had to be stopped as six people recently have developed a severe type of blood clot; although these effects are rare, it is still important to consider this, but this vaccine is still proven to prevent COVID-19.

In my opinion, I believe that we should not be worried about vaccine safety as there are processes that the FDA and CDC take to see if the vaccines are effective, and the safety system has been making sure to look out for signs of any problems from people that have been vaccinated. I also think that for the most part these vaccines are safe, as over the past few months millions of Americans have gotten vaccinated both times and have had success. In the article, it even talks about ways that the vaccine has been proven to be safe, which includes careful testing such as clinical trials, the vaccine’s authorization for emergency use, and of course the continuous monitoring for problems and side effects of people that have received a vaccine. I think that safety for people in regard to the vaccine has been a top priority for the federal agencies that have worked with vaccine manufacturers.

The article also talks about possible side effects of the vaccine, which are pain or swelling, fever, muscle aches, chills, fatigue, headaches or a combination of some of these, which may last about a day or two. It also discusses how the side effects for the vaccine may be different from the first to second shot where if you haven’t had COVID-19 the side effects may be worse and the opposite for if you have had COVID-19. I believe that with each vaccine, side effects are bound to happen so we all should not freak out over getting a fever or having muscle aches. Having side effects just means that these are signs your immune system is responding and preparing to fight the coronavirus, so I feel that this concept is not new and should not be panicked over.

For people that argue over why the Covid-19 vaccine was created so quickly over a few months, Johns Hopkins discusses these reasons. For one, the technologies used for the vaccines have been developed over the past few years, so the manufacturers were ready. Also, countries shared information about coronavirus when it was available, so developers have a head start on finding a cure and the government had given money to vaccine developers in advance, so these companies had everything they needed to get started. There was also a new technology used called messenger RNA that allows a faster approach to the vaccine than traditionally made, so it made everything faster. Overall, I think that everyone was prepared for creating the vaccine once it was developed, because there is innovative technologies and resources that are available to us at any time, in comparison to the vaccine for the Spanish Influenza back in the 1900s. Everyone has different opinions on the vaccine, so do what you feel is right for you, but there will probably come a day where you have to be vaccinated in order to do things such as travel.

 

 

References

Is the covid-19 vaccine safe? (n.d.). Retrieved April 21, 2021, from

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/is-the-covid19-vaccine-safe